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Mei Zhang
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Andrew Stein
Fulbright scholar exploring environment, agriculture, and tea.

September 22nd, 2014

Meet Our Bloggers

By: WildChina | Categories: WildChina Experts

Who are the people behind the scenes of the WildChina blog? Read about our team’s different personalities below!

 

Annika Frantizell

annika

Originally From: California, U.S.A.
Adventure Level: Medium
Dream City: Taipei
Travel Style: Cultural immersion
Favorite Travel Partner: Mom or girlfriends
Favorite Place: Taiwan
Favorite Mode of Travel: Moped
Least Favorite Mode: Subway during rush hour
Style : Fabulous
Should Have Been Born In: Hong Kong
Style Spirit Animal: Hedgehog – sharp but cute
Must Have Item During Travel:Sunblock
Theme Song When Traveling: La Oreja de Van Gogh – Geografía or Canardo – M’en Aller
Favorite Travel Quote: “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” ― Lao Tzu

 

Sylvia Liu

sylvia

Originally From: Beijing, China

Adventure Level: As long as I don’t need to touch bugs.
Travel Style: Like a local, food first
Favorite Travel Partner: Random traveler with the same taste and great camera
Favorite Place: Florence
Favorite Mode of Travel: Plane flown by hubby
Least Favorite Mode: Bus
Style : Monochromatic, eclectic
Should Have Been Born In: the future
Style Spirit Animal: Scarlet Johansson, Park Sora, Nini Nguyen
Must Have Item During Travel: Polaroid
Theme Song When Traveling: Massive Attack Paradise Circus or Bach, Cello Suite No.1 Prelude
Favorite Travel Quote: Wanderlust- Travel doesn’t become adventure until you leave yourself behind

Megan McDowell

Screen Shot 2014-09-22 at 4.09.02 PM

Originally From: Indiana, U.S.A.
Adventure Level: On a 1-10 scale, I’d be an 11

Dream City: Tokyo
Travel Style: Free spirit
Favorite Travel Partner: My best friend
Favorite Place: Thailand
Favorite Mode of Travel: Plane, preferably private
Least Favorite Mode: Car, unless its a fun road trip!
Style : Super Girly
Should Have Been Born In: France
Style Spirit Animal: Peacock
Must Have Item During Travel: Big hat
Theme Song When Traveling: My destination inspires my theme songs: Miami-Miami by Will Smith,  Bangkok-One Night in Bangkok by Murrary Head, Hong Kong-Toes by Zac Brown Band, etc.
Favorite Travel Quote: “Strangers are only friends you haven’t met yet.”

Kayla Paramore
Kayla
Originally From: Texas,U.S.A.
Adventure Level: HIGH
Dream City: Istanbul
Travel Style: Wanderer
Favorite Travel Partner: My little brother
Favorite Mode of Travel: Bicycle – you cover more ground than walking, but it’s easy to stop off and explore at any moment.
Least Favorite Mode: none? transportation is awesome!
Style: minimalist, with accent items (sometimes).
Must-have Travel Items: compass, hard-copy map of the area I’m traveling, notebook, book for reading, mosquito repellent stick, tiger balm, sleep mask, pack towel.
Theme Song When Travel: Something off of The National’s “Trouble Will Find Me” album.
Favorite Travel Quote:
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
- T.S. Eliot, Little Gidding

 

 

 

 


Tags: blogger profiles WildChina Experts

Comments on "Meet Our Bloggers"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

September 19th, 2014

Places to go During China’s October Holiday

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: WildChina Travel Tips

National Day in China is celebrated with a full “Golden Week” off (which this year falls on October 1st – October 7th), meaning all those residing in China have time to travel wherever they want. If you don’t plan ahead, the few remaining tickets and accommodations will be around double their original price. All major tourist destinations in China will be swamped with people, so you can cross a quiet hike at the Great Wall off your list.

As a result, it’s better not to travel to popular destinations like Beijing and Shanghai during Golden Week. For those of you who have this holiday off and are looking for something to do, here are some locations and trips we recommend that go to less touristy areas, perfect for the October holiday.

Private Tours:
Sichuan Province  
Sichuan offers remote,untouched natural landscapes that are great for exploring. A trekking adventure into Western Sichuan to Minya Gongga is perfect for the adventurous traveler. Check out our Trekking Mt. Minya Gongga trip.

sichuan
Sichuan Province

Guizhou province
Guizhou is relatively isolated and untouched by tourism.Check out our Discovering Hidden Minorities of Southeast Guizhou journey, which was featured in the Financial Times.

Tibet
Tibet is home to breathtaking landscape, remote terrains, and many sacred religious sites. If you travel here in late October or early November, there will be little to no tourists. Also, Tibetans are back from work during this season so you can encounter more local people.These private trips are great for nature and culture enthusiasts:  
1.Hiking the Pilgrimage Path: Ganden to Samye Monastery
2.Soul of Tibet

tibetMtEverest
Kartha Valley

Group Trips:  
Yunnan
In the fall, Yunnan is picture perfect; skies are a crisp blue and the trees are multicolored. The weather is great for hiking and picnic lunches. Our Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan trip is a great choice for fall.

The Silk Road
The Silk Road is rich in history and culture. Head to these less known stops on the Silk Road just as Marco Polo once did. This group tour offers a first hand look at this historic trade route: Along the Silk Road.

silkroad
Dunhuang,Gansu Province.Silk Road Tour.

 
If you can postpone your vacation to the weeks after the October holiday, late October or November, there are significantly less tourists, and accommodations won’t be inflated.
For more information on our trips, contact us at info@wildchina.com.
 


Tags: China National Holiday China travel tips Fall trips

Comments on "Places to go During China’s October Holiday"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

September 12th, 2014

Must Try Yunnan Recipes

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: China tours, Chinese cuisine

Chinese cuisine is much more than the sickeningly sweet orange chicken and limp chow mein you may have encountered outside of China. In fact, Chinese cuisine is very diverse and varies from province to province. For example, Beijing is known for its Peking duck while Sichuan is famous for its red chili or peppercorn based dishes and Hong Kong is famous for its dim sum.

WildChina has developed a new spinoff tour of our popular Gastronomic Tour with Fuchsia Dunlop that takes you to Yunnan province, one of the most geographically, ethnically, and culturally diverse regions in China which is home to a wide variety of exotic and diverse cuisines.

Yunnan cuisine provides a twist on the Chinese diet staples of rice and noodles with the use of exotic, savory spices and herbs. This region’s dishes feature local accents like mint, flowers, pineapple, mushrooms, and lemongrass. We’ve collected some Yunnan recipes below to get your taste buds excited and introduce you to this up-and-coming, increasingly trendy cuisine.

yunnanmeal
A local meal in Yunnan

Yunnan-style Soybeans
Soybeans (or edamame) are a popular snack in Asia served either shelled or peeled, depending on which part of Asia you are in. Here is a recipe for Yunnan-style soybeans that is simple but tasty – perfect for beginner chefs!

Yunnan Meal
For more advanced cooks, here is a whole Yunnan meal to try your hand at, consisting of Dai-style Ghost Chicken, Sichuan pepper oil, bean jelly, and salt-roasted broad beans.

Pineapple Sticky Rice
If you have a sweet tooth, try this healthy signature Dai minority dish.

Is your mouth watering yet? If you want to taste more of what Yunnan has to offer, check out our flavor-packed Yunnan Gastronomic Tour with Fuchsia Dunlop next October. For more info, contact us at info@wildchina.com.


Tags: China tours Chinese cuisine Yunnan food Yunnan recipes

Comments on "Must Try Yunnan Recipes"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

September 10th, 2014

Reasons You’ll Love Our Tea Travels

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, China tour

We focus on taking people on exciting, new adventures. Our Tea Travels with Jeff Fuchs is a trip designed to take you on a journey to experience local culture, ancient teas and tasty cuisines. Here are some highlights of the trip!  

1.Jeff Fuchs.
Jeff Fuchs, our 2011 WildChina Explorer grant winner, will be leading this trip. He is a well-known explorer, writer, and photographer and the first Westerner to have ever traveled the entire Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan Road. He has over a decade of tea exploration under his belt! Read an interview with Jeff Fuchs here.

tea
(Photo by Jeff Fuchs.2010 Xishuangbanna.)  

2.Homestay
While in Xishuangbanna, you’ll stay at an Aini village for one night. Here you will get a chance to spend time with the locals and see how they live. Village homestays are unique opportunities that give our clients a chance to experience local culture first hand. WildChina staff scouts out the villags in advance, ensuring they are clean and safe. Read about one of our experiences with a home stay here.

3.Chinese Cuisine
Adventurous Eater? During this journey, many meals will feature ethnic minority cuisine. In Xishuangbanna we will have dinner with Hani villagers and in each place we visit, we will try new teas, including those from ancient tea trees. We will taste the local flavors of Fujian by eating freshly caught fish and sweet, locally grown taro. You probably don’t eat like this at home but we like to give our guests the opportunity to experience this dynamic part of the region’s culture. In addition to local specialties, we make sure you’re provided with familiar Western food such as cereal and fresh coffee and tea for breakfast. (We can also provide special meals to those who have food allergies or special requirements.)

Teapicking
(Photo by Jeff Fuchs.2013 Yunnan.)

4.The locals
A trip favorite is interacting with locals. We go to minority villages where we eat and drink tea with local people. For example, you’ll have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the lives of the She ethnic group and join them in the tea fields as well as visiting a Bulang village where we’ll meet the descendants of the first tea cultivators.

5. Knowledge
You’ll learn a lot about tea: its origin, how to pick it, and how to participate in a proper tea ceremony. You’ll also gain insight into the local culture and religion. After this trip, you might become a tea expert yourself!

Tea Travels with Jeff Fuchs leaves in March 2015, perfect for a spring getaway! If you would like more information, contact us at info@wildchina.com.


Tags: China tours Jeff Fuchs tea tour

Comments on "Reasons You’ll Love Our Tea Travels"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

September 5th, 2014

8 Tips for Your Tibet Trek

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, Tibet Tips

WilChina prides itself on journeys that go above and beyond the typical itinerary. Some of our trips include more active adventures including hiking and trekking, so here are some tips to help you prepare for a trek.

hikinh

 

1.Prepare for Altitude Changes
You can climb high, but go slow! When hiking in the mountains, people can experience acute mountain sickness (AMS). People respond to changes in altitude differently – both experienced hikers and first timers can get altitude sickness. Some people don’t have a reaction while others react with symptoms such as headache, nausea, fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, and loss of appetite.

To avoid these unwanted symptoms and possibly a day in bed, it’s important to hike slowly when changing altitude. When going up, plan a practical journey that allows you to adapt steadily to the high altitude. Altitude sickness is not an issue when going down, so go as fast as your heart desires!
When WildChina travels to high altitudes, we plan time for rest and elevation adjustments. In the event of altitude sickness on one of our trips, our guides take hikers to a lower level to rest. Usually after some rest and water, symptoms go away.

2.Use Local Guides
In order to get a local experience during a trek (and to not get lost!), it’s important to travel with a local who knows the land and language. Also, be sure to do your research or ask family and friends to find someone you can trust.

Here at WildChina we combat such issues by hiring local, responsible, and friendly guides that will add a personal touch to your already epic trekking adventure!

mountain

3. Do Your Research
From our experience, it’s important to read about the places you’ll visit, even if it’s a simple Google search! Before going on a Tibet trip, WildChina recommends reading these books.

4. Be Prepared for the Worst

Rainstorms every night? Unexpected injury during the trek? You don’t know what’s going to happen! So, put this in mind when preparing for your hike.

Some things that WildChina recommends to bring for those unexpected disasters: itching cream, waterproof everything (jacket, shoes), extra batteries, headlamp, and first aid kit

5. Have Good Hiking Boots
Do your research in buying a great pair of hiking boots. These shoes become your life (and sometimes even life saver). Yes, a good pair of hiking boots is expensive, but the money spent will be worth it during long, enduring treks when your shoes are the only thing separating your feet from rain and/or snow.

 

hikinh2

6. Pack Light, but Pack Right
When it comes to trekking, you must find a balance between packing enough and not too little or too much.

WildChina provides you with top camping gear and cooking supplies, however, you’ll need to prepare some things yourself. We send out a detailed list to all of our clients beforehand to make sure you’re well prepared.

7. Prepare Your Body!
Depending on the route, some hikes can be physically challenging. To get your body ready for a long hike, it’s recommended to exercise before. It doesn’t have to be strenuous – you can do small things like climbing steps instead of taking the elevator. This is one of the easiest, most cost-effective ways to get ready for high elevation trekking. It’s best is to climb up a tall building’s staircases.

8. Have the Time of Your Life!
You may be one of the few to have trekked this route, so enjoy it! Take pictures and share your tales of chatting with nomads or running into a herd of domesticated yaks with your friends and family.

WildChina ventures to Tibet frequently. We explore the land with experienced guides and high quality equipment, allowing clients to experience active adventure with more comfortable travel conditions. We have two trips that are considered moderate,Expedition to Tibet’s Far West (Winner of National Geographic’s 50 Tours of a Lifetime for 2014) and Journey to Tibet’s Mt. Kailash Guge Kingdom.These journeys are designed for you to discover the hidden sites that the scenic land Tibet has to offer. For more information contact us at info@wildchina.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tags: China travel tips hiking in Tibet Tibet tips trekking

Comments on "8 Tips for Your Tibet Trek"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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I do believe all the ideas you have offered in your post. They aree really convincing and can certainly work. Nonetheless, the posts are too brief for newbies. May just you please lengthen them a little from next time? Thank you for the post.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

August 29th, 2014

Along China’s Silk Road

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, China Travel

 

When you first heard of the Silk Road, you might have had romantic ideas of a smooth road made out of silk. In reality, the Silk Road is not even a road at all but an ancient network of trading routes that linked China all the way to the Mediterranean Sea. Also, the road is not paved in silk and was far from a smooth journey in historic times. Judy Bonavia describes it well below:
“The early trade in silk was carried on against incredible odds by great caravans of merchants and animals traveling over some of the most inhospitable territory on Earth, including searing, waterless deserts and snowbound mountain passes. Beginning at the magnificent ancient Chinese city of Chang’an (Xi’an), the route took traders westward along the Hexi Corridor to the giant barrier of the Great Wall, then either orth or south of the Taklamakan Desert to Kashgar before continuing on to India and Iran, or farther to the great cities of Constantinople, Damascus and Baghdad. For today’s traveler, it is not only the weight of history that makes the Silk Road intriguing, but the incredible diversity of scenery and ethnic people along the way.” -The Silk Road: Xi’an to Kashgar

The Silk Road earned its title because silk made up a large proportion of trade along this route. Originating in China, silk-making was China’s well-guarded secret for almost 2,000 years. Silk was so valuable to people that prices were calculated in lengths of silk, just like they had been calculated in pounds of gold. It even became a currency used in trade with foreign countries.

Silk was not the only good traded on the Silk Road-people traded bronze, bamboo products, teas, medicine, and porcelain. There were many available routes to travel; ome were shorter and more dangerous, while others were longer and safer. Most of the things traded along the Silk Road were luxury items because the profit, to some, was worth the risk.

silkroad3

People exchanged religion, culture, philosophy, and art along the Silk Road. The route connected merchants, monks, and nomads from around the world and was an ancient highway for globalization. Innovative ideas that were traded along the route, like grape winemaking and paper money, are still in use today. By allowing people to make their first contact with distant civilizations, the Silk Road helped lay the foundations for the modern world.

Today, these ancient routes aren’t used to trade goods and ideas with other countries. Instead, the Silk Road is traveled by people who want to see the land and learn about the history and culture of the region. Most of the Silk Road is located in Xianjiang province in northwest China. Xianjiang is home to 47 ethnic minorities, including the Uygur, the major ethnic group living here. Uygur are the second largest Muslim ethnic group in China. They have their own Islamic culture and Turkic language, which uses a modified form of the Arabic alphabet.

silkroad

China’s northwest region is home to the beginning of the old, dangerous route, earning the nickname, “Wild West of China”. Today the region is safe and more accessible. While in this part of the country you feel like you are in Central Asia, not typical China. The people, clothes, culture, and cuisine are influenced from the ancient trade routes. Those who visit are fascinated by the diverse culture, people, and landscape.

 

 

If you are interesting learning about the Silk Road, we recommend reading, The Silk Road:from Xi’an to Kashgar, by Judy Bonavia. For a hands on experience, WildChina offers a trip, Along the Silk Road, departing in October.

 

 


Tags: ChinaSilkRoad

Comments on "Along China’s Silk Road"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 18 2014 Posted By: IC plan
I do believe all the ideas you have offered in your post. They aree really convincing and can certainly work. Nonetheless, the posts are too brief for newbies. May just you please lengthen them a little from next time? Thank you for the post.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

August 27th, 2014

6 Facts about Tibet

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, China tours, Tibet Travel

Nature and religion define Tibet, so if you’re interested in viewing sacred sites or beautiful nature, it  should be on your list of travel destinations. Tibetans have a distinct culture and religion that sets them apart from the rest of the world. Along with rich history, Tibet has some of China’s most striking natural scenery, including vast grasslands, blue lakes and sky-high mountains.

tibet road to gyantse

1.Foreign travel to Tibet used to be restricted.
Tourists were first permitted to visit Tibet in the 1980s. Since then, people have been traveling to Tibet to learn about Buddhism and see the pure nature. The main tourist attractions are the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple , Namtso Lake, Samye Monastery, and Mt. Everest. Some areas remain restricted to tourists.

2.Tibet is considered one of the most secluded regions on earth.
Tibet is the least populated province in China, mostly due to its mountainous and harsh geographical features. The mountain ranges that surround Tibet create a barrier from the rest of the world, leaving some places in Tibet uninhabited. The mountains in Tibet average 22,960 feet high, earning the nickname “Roof of the World”. In Tibet, there are five mountains over 26,240 feet, including the world’s highest peak, Mount Everest. Tibet is a great playground for hikers. Also, frequent flights to Lhasa, the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, and several highways to Tibet have made Tibet easily accessible.

Tibetmonks

3.Buddism is the foundation of Tibet’s culture and everyday life.
In Tibet, Buddhism is not just a religious belief, it is a  way of life. You can see the influence of Buddhism throughout this region. Tibetans view the environment as a place where humans and nature coexist, therefore most of their land is colorful and pure. There are a great  amount of sacred sites, such as monasteries, nunneries, and palaces, to explore while in Tibet.

4.47% of the world’s population depends on the flow of fresh water from Tibet.
The Tibetan plateau has the third largest store of water and ice in the world. Tibet is the sources of many of Asia’s rivers. Tibet’s glaciers, rivers, forests, lakes, and wetlands provide key environmental resources to Asia.

5.Tibet is sometimes called the “Sea of Dances and Songs”.
Tibetans love music and dancing. Every night local people get in a circle around a fire and dance the night away. While visiting Tibet, you can participate in a nightly dance while sipping on one of their  national drinks, salted butter tea or Tibetan chang. Chang is an alcoholic drink that is made of barley, rice or millet. Tibetans of all ages drink chang at funerals, dinners, and celebrations.

tibetlhasa

6.Tibetan people believe Lake Yamdrok carries deep spiritual meaning.
Many pilgrims visit the lake prior to making important decisions, they believe the turquoise water of Lake Yamdrok carries deep spiritual meaning. Lake Yamdrok is one of the many beautiful place to visit in Tibet. Clear blue lakes, deep valleys and rivers, snow covered mountains, and green forests can all be found across the region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tags: adventure travel China China travel Tibet

Comments on "6 Facts about Tibet"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

August 24th, 2014

Stand In The Majestic Roof of the World:Tibet

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, China Travel, Tibet Travel

Why Tibet?
People have many kinds of travel styles and adventure levels: some people like to get away and relax on a beach, some seek thrills like bungee jumping or scuba diving, while others enjoy visiting historic sites and learning new information. Here at WildChina, we like to keep our adventure level high and our travel style a mix of exploration and luxury. One place that brings out our adventurous side is Tibet.
Tibet is not the first place that pops in your head when planning a trip to China. It is very different from the China you see on TV or in the media. The mountain ranges that surround it make it one of the most secluded regions on earth, giving this region its own cuisine, faith, and landscape. Along with rich history, Tibet has some of China’s most striking natural scenery, including vast grasslands, blue lakes and sky-high mountains as well a great amount of sacred sites, including monasteries, nunneries, and palaces. If you’re interested in viewing sacred sites or beautiful nature, Tibet should be on your list of travel destinations.

“Rich or poor, all come full of devotion and with no inner misgivings to lay their offerings before the gods and to pray for their blessing. Is there any people so uniformly attached to their religion and so obedient to it in their daily life? I have always envied the Tibetans their simple faith, for all my life I have been a seeker.”
― Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Religion-Tsedang:
Buddhism developed in Tibet and the surrounding Himalayan region in the beginning of the 7th century. Tibet’s long history of Buddhism has inspired the building of many religious sites. In Tibet’s largest city, Tsedang, you can find Buddhist monasteries, monuments, tombs and royal burial sites. Samye Monastery, the oldest standing Tibetan Buddhist monastery, is a Tibet highlight. Samye is both a monastery and a village and used to be a school for Tibetan Buddhism. Some Tibetan Buddhists travel on foot for weeks to reach this popular pilgrimage destination.

Note: Out of respect, always walk around Tibetan Buddhist religious sites or monastery in a clockwise direction and don’t climb onto statues or other sacred objects

Tibetanmonks

“Tibet has not yet been infested by the worst disease of modern life, the everlasting rush. No one overworks here. Officials have an easy life. They turn up at the office late in the morning and leave for their homes early in the afternoon.” ― Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Culture-Lhasa:
Tibetans live a easygoing life. They like music, games, and dancing. In Tibet you can participate in a nightly dance with locals, sample yak cheese, yoghurt, or butter, while sipping on the national drink, salted butter tea.
Tibet’s richest cultural marvels are found in Tibet’s capital, Lhasa. Buddhism is not just a religious belief, for many it is a way of life. Lhasa has been the center of Tibet’s political, religious, economic and cultural activities since the Fifth Dalai Lama moved the capital here in 1642.
This city is home to Potala Palace. This palace has served as both the winter residence of each Dalai Lama and the religious and political center of Tibet for 300 years. In 1645, it was built without either nails or the use of wheeled equipment. Today, it provides dormitories for the staff of the Dalai Lama schools, chapels, print house and tombs.

 Lhasa

“The country through which we had been travelling for days has an original beauty. Wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes.We often had to wade through swift running ice-cold brooks. It has long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barka, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailash, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalayan range.”
― Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Landscape-Gyantse:
Tibetans view the environment as a place where humans and nature coexist and overconsumption of resources is looked down upon. Because of these Buddhist beliefs, the nature in Tibet is pure and well preserved. Gyantse is a great city to visit if you enjoy nature. Located 14,500 feet above sea level, the turquoise Yamdrok Lake is a famous stop for Tibetans and travelers. While visiting Yamdrok Lake in Gyantse, you can see views of Mount Donang Sangwari (17,400 feet) and the white peaks of Nojin Gangzang (23,000 feet). Be careful of altitude sickness; the mountains in Tibet average 22,960 feet high, earning the nickname “Roof of the World”.

The land, faith, and culture make Tibet an unforgettable experience.

In October, WildChina is going on a journey to Tibet. On our Soul of Tibet trip, we explores sacred sites and nature, while experiencing Tibetan Buddhism. Want to up your adventure level? Contact info@WildChina.com for more information.

 


Tags: China travel Tibet

Comments on "Stand In The Majestic Roof of the World:Tibet"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

August 15th, 2014

Yunnan’s Ancient Tea&Horse Caravan Road

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, Best China Tour Operator, China travel guide

Where in China can you experience a mix of history, culture, and nature?      
You can explore some of China’s most diverse cultures, ecology, and landscapes in Yunnan Province, just south of the Tibetan Plateau. Yunnan features green low-lying valleys, white-capped mountains, and a vast assortment of ethnic communities. This diverse terrain is home to the beginning of The Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan Road, or “The Silk Road of Southern China”.

The 3,100-mile route of the Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan Road started in Southern China, passed through Tibet, Burma, Nepal, and ended in India. China’s desire to import horses from Tibet and Tibet’s desire to import tea from China was the main motivation of the trade along the Tea and Horse Caravan Road. Traveling this route was difficult due to its diverse terrain, and one minor misstep could be fatal for both trader and animals.

H&TCRoad

Today, the Tea and Horse Caravan Road attracts people from all over the world with its assorted teas, mixed cultures, stunning landscapes, and ancient centers of trade. By traveling along this route, travelers can experience both ancient and modern China by learning about the culture of local ethnic communities, hiking in the ancient tea tree forests, and exploring the scenic mountain, rivers and valleys.

How can you get there?
WildChina can take you on a 13 day journey along the route of the Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan Road in Yunnan. The first stop, Xishuangbanna, is the original place of pu’erh tea production. In Xishuangbanna, you can buy premium pu’erh tea at Menghai market, meet the descendants of the first tea cultivators, and stay in an Aini Village homestay. We pass through Dali as we follow the route through sloping valleys, golden barley and canola fields to Shaxi. After Shaxi, we see Lijiang’s Old Town and the legendary Yangtze River on our way to Shangri-La. In Shangri-La, we explore Songzanlin Monastery, the largest Tibetan lamasery in Yunnan, the Napahai Lake, and visit a nearby artisan village.


TeaAndHorseMap

Are you a spontaneous planner?
Join us this October in Yunnan! This is our last small group trip of the year, led by Jeff Fuchs, the first Westerner to have ever traveled the whole road. Our journey to China’s  Ancient Tea and Horse Caravan Road begins October 15 and ends October 24. If you’re interested in retracing the steps of those who traveled this ancient road, contact info@wildchina.com.

Like to make plans in advance?
If you’re interested in tea or Yunnan cuisine, keep your eyes open for our 2015 small group departures which include a tea-based journey of China and Taiwan with Jeff Fuchs and a special gastronomic tour of Yunnan with expert Fuchsia Dunlop.

 

 

 

 

 


Tags: China tours China travel china travel guide

Comments on "Yunnan’s Ancient Tea&Horse Caravan Road"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

August 14th, 2014

Sixth year in a row! Travel+Leisure Names Mei Zhang Top Travel Agent for China

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Luxury China Travel, WildChina Announcements

When booking a trip, the travel company you choose can make the difference between an ordinary or extraordinary travel experience. To guide travelers in the right direction, the editors of Travel + Leisure assess hundreds of travel agents around the world and select the best to make up their annual list of “A-list Top Travel Specialists”. WildChina’s founder, Mei Zhang, is featured on their 2014 list for her standard-setting services in China travel. The elite list features 133 of the world’s top advisors, arranged by location of expertise.

“There’s a reason we use the term advisor to describe the members of our 2014 A-List,” said Travel + Leisure News Editor and “Trip Doctor” columnist Amy Farley. “These destination experts offer much more than booking services. They offer insider insights, unparalleled access, the ability to create a seamless itinerary, and value.”

i-RV4cDcC-L A-List 2014[5][2] (1)

Mei can now add this accolade to her list of awards and recognitions, which include:Travel + Leisure’s   2009-2012 A-Lists of Top Travel Agents, Condé Nast Traveler Top Travel Specialist in 2010 and 2011, and The Daily Beast’s 2012 list of Women in the World. Riding on Mei’s 14 years of experience in the luxury travel industry, WildChina provides both insider access to China and personalized service. WildChina’s specialties are China, Tibet and custom luxury itineraries.

According to Mei, she “witnessed the push and pull between economic development and conservation of both nature and culture in Yunnan.” This push and pull inspired her to create WildChina to provide people with a sophisticated version of Chinese culture and nature through first-hand travel.

WildChina has also received acknowledgments for our luxury travel services, which set the bar for tailored, authentic travel experiences. In 2009 National Geographic selected WildChina as one of Adventure Magazine’s Best Adventure Travel Companies on Earth, Traveler Magazine’s 50 Tours of a Lifetime, and Harvard Business Reviewed named WildChina “a leader in its field.”

Travel + Leisure’s thirteenth annual A-list will be featured in the September issue of Travel + Leisure and on travelandleisure.com. Congratulations Mei!


Tags: China travel chinatravelservice Mei Zhang travel in China WildChina

Comments on "Sixth year in a row! Travel+Leisure Names Mei Zhang Top Travel Agent for China"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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I do believe all the ideas you have offered in your post. They aree really convincing and can certainly work. Nonetheless, the posts are too brief for newbies. May just you please lengthen them a little from next time? Thank you for the post.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

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