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Mei Zhang
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Andrew Stein
Fulbright scholar exploring environment, agriculture, and tea.

October 29th, 2014

The China NCPA Orchestra Comes to America

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: China News

NCA

The National Center for the Performing Arts is bringing the sounds of China’s top musicians on a traveling tour across the US and Canada this November 2 through November 13. WildChina is honored to be the China NCPA’s official travel guide on their journey. We will be showing China’s finest musicians all the best of the US, while making sure their journey is comfortable and enjoyable so they can focus on performing.

This is a wonderful opportunity for our US friends and travel partners to experience a bit of China in their own home cities. Take a look at the NCPA itinerary and see if they will be coming to your area.

See the NCPA website for all the details.


Tags: China News NCPA Orchestra

Comments on "The China NCPA Orchestra Comes to America"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 28th, 2014

Rosewood Brings Ultra-Luxury to Beijing

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: WildChina Announcements, WildChina Travel Tips

rosewood
Photo credit: Hospitalitynet.org

Rosewood Hotel Group, known for their ultra-luxury brand and curated local experiences, has opened their first Asia property in Beijing. The hotel is lavished with curated art pieces making the whole experience like a living gallery. Rosewood focuses on giving guests a ‘sense of place,’ hand-selecting experiences for an authentic taste of the city where they stay. Our very own, Mei Zhang, CEO of WildChina, was chosen as one of the hotel’s two curators for Beijing and offers her own unique Beijing experience suggestions to Rosewood guests. The hotel is located in Beijing’s Chaoyang district, just across from the iconic CCTV tower, and has 283 rooms and suites, beginning at 50 square meters, some of the largest in the city.

Visit the website for more details.

 

 


Tags: RosewoodBeijing WildChina Travel Tips

Comments on "Rosewood Brings Ultra-Luxury to Beijing"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 28th, 2014

New Xi’an Restaurant:Great Option for Terracotta Warriors Visitors

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: Dining Experiences in China, WildChina Travel Tips

xianreseturant

A newly opened restaurant in Xi’an, called Da Qin Xiao Ai (大秦小爱), is already rumored to be one of the top restaurants in the city. Intricately decorated in the ancient Qin dynasty style, the restaurant gives diners an impression of how the Emperor Qin Shi Huang might have enjoyed his meals. With a great location just 15 minutes from the Terracotta Warriors, this restaurant is an excellent choice for travelers. Our recommendations? The Gourd-shaped chicken, the Chinese Yam and Glutinous Rice Wrapped in Dates, and a Beefsteak!

Chinese name: 大秦小爱
Operating hours: 11:00-21:00
Average cost: CNY128-288 per person, set meal.
Location: No.9, Feng Huang Da Dao, Lintong district, Xi’an.


Tags: Top Xi'an Restaurants Travel Tip

Comments on "New Xi’an Restaurant:Great Option for Terracotta Warriors Visitors"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 27th, 2014

Silk Road Film Festival Begins in Xi’an

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: China News, Chinese Culture

silkroad
The Xi’an City Wall.Photo Credit:Mariusz Kluzniak via flikr
 

The first Silk Road Film Festival kicked off this week in Xi’an, promoting cultural exchange among countries along the traditional Silk Road route. More than one hundred films will be screened over the course of the week-long festival, with 41 Chinese and foreign films already chosen for the final competition. The festival will also play heavily on the Silk Road theme, showing documentary-style footage from various countries along the Silk Road, and sporting traditional Tang dynasty decor and clothing.


Tags: China News Xi'an film festival

Comments on "Silk Road Film Festival Begins in Xi’an"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 24th, 2014

A Guide to China’s 72-hour Visa Exemption Program

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: China News, WildChina Travel Tips

Before setting off for my first China adventure, I had the option to apply for a visa at a Chinese consulate in person or pay an agent to do it for me. Being a person who enjoys travel whether it be for business or leisure, I choose to make the 3-hour road trip to the nearest Chinese consulate to complete the two day process. Either way, foreigners jetting off to China must apply for a visa regardless of whether their intended stay lasts a few days or a few weeks. Now there is good news – a growing number of Chinese cities have passed 72-hour Transit Visa Exemption Programs. Hangzhou has been the latest to join this program, as recently as October 20th, while Kunming joined on October 1st.

How does the 72-hour visa program work?
This program applies to foreign visitors from 51 countries who have continuing flights to third countries. Travelers must already have tickets for a flight that departs for a third country within 72 hours of their having landed in China and possess valid international travel documents allowing them to enter their final destination.

The visa exemption program can’t be extended beyond 72 hours. If a traveler is unable to depart within 72 hours for unexpected reasons, such as a flight cancellation or sudden illness, they need to apply for a visa from the Municipal Public Security Bureau.

passports

Limitations:
The 72-hour visa free stay only applies to transit via airports. Passengers by train or any other modes of transport are not eligible. Also, this program does not apply to passengers traveling on round trip flights, for example: a US citizen flying from Korea to Beijing for 3 days and then back to Korea would not be eligible.

What cities and airports offer 72-hour visa free transit?
Currently, Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, Xi’an, Guilin, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Kunming, Dalian, Chongqing, and Shenyang. Visitors can only travel within the precinct they fly into, which means they cannot visit other cities in China or leave the administrative region where they have landed (for example, a traveler taking advantage of this policy in Beijing would not be able to go to Tianjin for a day).

airplane

What can I experience in 72 hours?
With a limited amount of time in China, it’s important to maximize your time and minimize your stress. Our Concierge service does just that: we can pick you up from the airport, provide you with a reliable driver and transport, and / or arrange flexible guided tours and return you the airport in time for your next flight. Take a look at our preexisting itineraries below to get an idea of what you can experience during 3 days. While nearly all of these itineraries are longer than 3 days, you can pick and choose any activities you like. All these itineraries are customizable to your preferences.

Beijing
Explore China’s illustrious history at the Great Wall and Forbidden City or China’s modern side at the Olympic Park and 798 Art District. Check out our Beijing itinerary.

Shanghai
With 72 hours in Shanghai, we recommend going to the Bund, the French Concession, Yu Garden, or the Shanghai Museum. Browse our sample itinerary to discover all the “Paris of the East” has to offer.

Chengdu
Chengdu is famous for its iconic pandas, spicy cuisine, and face-changing opera. Look at our Chengdu itinerary for inspiration on how to spend 72 hours in Sichuan’s laidback capital.

Xi’an
You can get a special VIP view of the Terracotta Warriors or relax with a private taichi lesson on the city’s ancient wall while transiting through Xi’an. Our 3-day adventure is the perfect itinerary for 72 hours in Xi’an.

Guilin
This area of China is so stunning that it’s featured on the 20 yuan bill. 72 hours in Guilin will afford you with enough time to discover this area’s natural beauty and diverse culture.

For more information, contact us at info@wildchina.com

 

Find out more about 72-hour visa-free transit.

 

 


Tags: 72 hour visa exemption program China travel tips

Comments on "A Guide to China’s 72-hour Visa Exemption Program"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 22nd, 2014

Our Shared Experience in Yunnan

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Adventure Travel in China, Education Travel

studentshike1
A group of students hiking in the Abujee mountains

Adventure offer an opportunity for personal growth at any age. When we create a trip, we want it to be a meaningful journey. Here at WildChina, we strive to see people learn and grow from their experiences with us. Recently, we led a brave group of international high school students and teachers on an educational adventure in Yunnan province. Our guides shared the highlights, cultural exchanges and WOW moments of their moving education trip.

Farmwork
Community service at a Tibetan family farm

Informed that one afternoon of community service at a local family farm would help complete a few days worth of hard work, the students and teachers weren’t hesitant to roll up their sleeves and help out the Tibetan family. They jumped right in and with a few instructions, chopped down barley with sharp sickles, secured their big bundles with barley ties, and put the golden barley on an old tractor to be hulled away
 to the barn.

Most Tibetans speak in Tibetan languages, so our local WildChina guides usually translate, but on this occasion, the quick-witted students took communication into their own hands. They worked side-by-side with the local Tibetan family while using universal hand motions and facial expressions to communicate. They used arm motions to signal strength, smiles to exchanging gratitude and appreciation, and big waves of goodbyes and thank yous. After seeing the huge loads of barley they harvested, the students, teachers, and guides directly saw the true value of their work at the family farm. The students’ feelings of accomplished glowed on their young, tired faces.

Tibetanfieldwork
Students working hard in the barley field

Spending an evening at a Tibetan home gave the students another opportunity for a shared cultural experience. After a tasty Tibetan meal, the family preformed a lively traditional dance, and then asked the high school students to join. After dancing around the room with the locals, the students decided it was time the switch things up and teach the kind family some Western dance moves.

The energetic students choose one of the most iconic 1990s dance hits, the Macarena. A student played the song from their iPhone as they taught the family the catchy dance. The Tibetan women and children had a blast! Seeing the huge smiles on the family’s faces, sharing laughs and exchanging dances, taught the high school students that while it’s great to go and experience new culture, it’s also rewarding to share yours along the way.

familydance
Sharing dances at a Tibetan family home

Along their adventure in the Tibetan plateau, the high school students were taking trip notes of their exciting learning experiences for a paper they would create after the Yunnan trip. One student had another idea for the project; instead of writing a conventional paper, he would capture the magic of Yunnan with a video compilation. He video recorded the community service, the strenuous hikes in the Abujee mountains, the tour of a local school and villages, and every smile and struggle in between.

On their last night camping,sitting around a bright,warm fire in the Abujee mountains, the student volunteered his video for viewing. Projected onto the ceiling of the tent, the students, teachers, and guides watched their life-altering journey together. Mixed emotions overcame the group as they watched their trekking voyage unfold in front of them.

studentscamp
Wildlife visiting the campsite

Outside the tent, local Tibetans who were assisting the trip, caught a view of the video as well; this was the first time some of them saw themselves on video. They were in awe at the technology and thoroughly enjoyed seeing themselves, some even wondering, ‘Do I really look like that?!’
After viewing the touching video, one of the teachers told a WildChina guide that she loved being a teacher because she can guide students to learn, but it’s breathtaking seeing students take their learning into their own hands. On this expedition, the students stepped out of the classroom to learn about Tibetan people and experience the culture hands on, changing themselves and the Tibetans they befriended along the way.

camp
Students’ campsite

If you would like to Experience China Differently with us, contact info@wildchina.com.


Tags: educational travel China

Comments on "Our Shared Experience in Yunnan"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 21st, 2014

40th Anniversary of the Terracotta Warriors Discovery

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: China News, WildChina Travel Tips

Warriors

Four decades ago, local farmers in Shaanxi province were hard at work digging a well when they came across one of the world’s grandest archeological discoveries. Four chambers were eventually unearthed, filled with over 6,000 soldiers, horses and chariots arranged in military formation. Now travelers from around the world come to see these treasures and hear stories of the ruthless Qin Shi Huang Emperor who unified China and had a fondness for burying things, both statues and dissidents.

In celebration of the discovery a new exhibit has opened in Xi’an displaying special never-before-seen pieces including clay fragments that still retain some of their original color. The exhibition will continue until March 2015.


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Comments on "40th Anniversary of the Terracotta Warriors Discovery"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 20th, 2014

Conde Nast Recommends October for China Travel

By: Kayla Paramore | Categories: WildChina Travel Tips

Octoberchina

There’s just a little bit of time left to complete all of the Conde Nast travel recommendations for the month of October. Start book your Christmas tickets, get an early deal on 2015 cruises and, of course, follow the advise of our very own, Mei Zhang and go see China. Check out the full recommendation list here.

 

 


Tags: China travel WildChina Travel Tips

Comments on "Conde Nast Recommends October for China Travel"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

October 10th, 2014

An Introduction to Taiwan

By: Megan McDowell | Categories: Travel Guide to Taiwan

People tend to stereotype Taiwan as a little, overcrowded island centered around manufacturing industries. However, Taiwan is much more than that. Taiwan has something for everyone: stunning natural scenery, rich traditional and modern culture, beautiful beaches, renowned hot springs and delicious food.

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Culture:
Taiwanese culture is the distinct result of a mix of traditional Chinese, aboriginal, and Japanese culture, which is reflected in Taiwan’s food. Taiwanese people are known for treating others with politeness and respect and the friendliness of the local population is remembered long afterwards.

Nature:
Do you love the outdoors? Taiwan’s nature varies from sandy beaches to misty mountains, which gives guests an array of destinations to visit. Many people go on weekend trips to Hualien to escape the hustle and bustle of city life and relax on the coast. Taroko Gorge, a 12 mile long canyon bursting with green vegetation and turquoise waters, is located in in Hualien. There are activities for the whole family ranging from swimming, water sports and hiking.

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Taiwan is also home to pebble beaches, beaches of golden sand, and even black sand beaches. Recommended beaches:

1.Kenting’s golden sand beaches are located on the southernmost tip of Taiwan and are the best beaches in Taiwan. Fun family activities include boating, diving, swimming, surfing and jet skiing.

2. Hualien’s Cow Mountain Beach is located perfectly between Taiwan’s aquamarine ocean and sky-high mountains, offering easy access to both. This isolated black sand beach is a great place to relax in untouched nature.

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Tea:
Taiwan is known for refreshing, first-rate oolong tea. Oolong tea flourishes due to Taiwan’s geographical location and mountainous landscape. There are many locations throughout Taiwan that you can visit tea plantations and sample freshly picked tea.

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Hot Springs:
If you want a relaxing getaway, there are more than 150 hot springs throughout the country you can visit. The warm waters of these springs soothe, revitalize and reinvigorate the body, perfect for a relaxing vacation.

 

If you are interested in visiting Taiwan, come relax with us on our Refreshing Taiwan trip! Contact info@wildchina.com for more information.


Tags: China luxury travel Taiwan introduction

Comments on "An Introduction to Taiwan"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

September 22nd, 2014

Meet Our Bloggers

By: WildChina | Categories: WildChina Experts

Who are the people behind the scenes of the WildChina blog? Read about our team’s different personalities below!

 

Annika Frantzell

annika

Originally From: California, U.S.A.
Adventure Level: Medium
Dream City: Taipei
Travel Style: Cultural immersion
Favorite Travel Partner: Mom or girlfriends
Favorite Place: Taiwan
Favorite Mode of Travel: Moped
Least Favorite Mode: Subway during rush hour
Style : Fabulous
Should Have Been Born In: Hong Kong
Style Spirit Animal: Hedgehog – sharp but cute
Must Have Item During Travel:Sunblock
Theme Song When Traveling: La Oreja de Van Gogh – Geografía or Canardo – M’en Aller
Favorite Travel Quote: “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” ― Lao Tzu

 

Sylvia Liu

sylvia

Originally From: Beijing, China

Adventure Level: As long as I don’t need to touch bugs.
Travel Style: Like a local, food first
Favorite Travel Partner: Random traveler with the same taste and great camera
Favorite Place: Florence
Favorite Mode of Travel: Plane flown by hubby
Least Favorite Mode: Bus
Style : Monochromatic, eclectic
Should Have Been Born In: the future
Style Spirit Animal: Scarlet Johansson, Park Sora, Nini Nguyen
Must Have Item During Travel: Polaroid
Theme Song When Traveling: Massive Attack Paradise Circus or Bach, Cello Suite No.1 Prelude
Favorite Travel Quote: Wanderlust- Travel doesn’t become adventure until you leave yourself behind

Megan McDowell

Screen Shot 2014-09-22 at 4.09.02 PM

Originally From: Indiana, U.S.A.
Adventure Level: On a 1-10 scale, I’d be an 11

Dream City: Tokyo
Travel Style: Free spirit
Favorite Travel Partner: My best friend
Favorite Place: Thailand
Favorite Mode of Travel: Plane, preferably private
Least Favorite Mode: Car, unless its a fun road trip!
Style : Super Girly
Should Have Been Born In: France
Style Spirit Animal: Peacock
Must Have Item During Travel: Big hat
Theme Song When Traveling: Depends on the destination
Favorite Travel Quote: “Strangers are only friends you haven’t met yet.”

Kayla Paramore
Kayla

Originally From: Texas,U.S.A.
Adventure Level: HIGH
Dream City: Istanbul
Travel Style: Wanderer
Favorite Travel Partner: My little brother
Favorite Mode of Travel: Bicycle – you cover more ground than walking, but it’s easy to stop off and explore at any moment.
Least Favorite Mode: none? transportation is awesome!
Style: minimalist, with accent items (sometimes).
Must-have Travel Items: compass, hard-copy map of the area I’m traveling, notebook, book for reading, mosquito repellent stick, tiger balm, sleep mask, pack towel.
Theme Song When Travel: Something off of The National’s “Trouble Will Find Me” album.
Favorite Travel Quote:
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
- T.S. Eliot, Little Gidding

 

Christiana Zhu
chris

Originally From: Auckland, New Zealand
Adventure Level: Hardcore​
Dream city​: ​Atlantis – underwater city (wreck diving is so much fun)
Travel Style​: ​Live like a local, always searching for tasty morsels and hidden gems…
Favorite Travel Partner​: My sister​
Favorite Place​: Anywhere with great company
Favorite Mode of Travel​: Roadtrip
Least Favorite Mode​: Bus​
Style: Mountain Chic​
Must Have Item During Travel​: SwissCard – Swiss Army multi-tool in the size of a credit card which you can conveniently tuck away in your wallet
Them​e​ Song When Traveling: Local music of the place in which I am traveling
Favorite Travel Quote: “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”​- Mark Twain​


Tags: blogger profiles WildChina Experts

Comments on "Meet Our Bloggers"


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sep 06 2012 Posted By: Mary Barnes
What a beautiful moment. Excellent blog. The description sent early morning chills down my spine. Thousands of silent soldiers marching the wall came to mind in the dawn light. I have been there and was amazed at the formidable snake crawling over the hills. Mary
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Well done especially from such an elite group as the Harvard Business School.
 
Aug 24 2012 Posted By: Gabrielle
Absolutely splendid story. Bravo to Xiao.
 
Aug 23 2012 Posted By: PL
Smart and kind of you, good luck to you with Teach for China.
 
Aug 17 2012 Posted By: Cathryn Noyes
Wow Devin, just beautiful. What a trip. The photos and words make me (almost) feel like I am there!
 
 
Aug 08 2012 Posted By: Linda Winn
Wonderful story and video! Xiao is not only a fantastic guide, but he is kind,thoughtful,enthusiastic,fun-loving and generous. How great to bring such happiness to the Miao people by building them something the whole village can enjoy and sharing his love for basketball with all of them. Congratulations to him and the village basketball champions!
 
Jul 24 2012 Posted By: Bobby
Good article, Iv always wanted to visit China and after reading this I want to go even more!
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: may
Fun & fabulous WildChina crew! -Your Taiwan fans
 
Jul 12 2012 Posted By: ellen
You guys look amazing!
 
Jul 09 2012 Posted By: Tibetan Jewelry
Very interesting! Tibet's ancient "silk road" was influential before recorded history. Your history on that influence and its connection to Tibet's cultural artifacts is very interesting! How else would they have gotten that coral and those conch shells! The tea and horse road in Yunnan is great.
 
Jun 15 2012 Posted By: Nancy
Hi Mark, Great to hear from you. We believe that you should be set to go and will be able to get the permit. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch at Info@wildchina.com. We can learn more specifics about your group and where you want to travel in Tibet. -WildChina
 
Jun 14 2012 Posted By: Mark
Is it true that permits are now being issued? We are a group of 7 Australians looking to travel to Lhasa at the end of June. Is this possible? Mark
 
Jun 11 2012 Posted By: Guo Yanjiang
Hope to travel in West China
 
Mar 06 2012 Posted By: Mei
One of my favorite stores in Beijing.
 
Mar 01 2012 Posted By: Chaiton W.
I am a sixth-grade student at Baylor School in Chattanooga, TN. I’m working on a documentary film on the topic of Chinese food, do you think you might be able to help me with information. Could you answer some questions for my research? What is the most famous cooking stile? Why is it the most famous? What made you go into chinese food? Thank you for your time and if you can email me back. Sincerely, Chaiton W Greetings, In the interest of authentic, performance-based learning, my middle-school students are reaching out to experts about China as they prepare a documentary film about a topic of their choice. If you can, I appreciate very much your willingness to answer a few questions they have, taking just a few minutes of your time, I hope. I’ve tried to make sure they’re asking “expert” questions, after having done basic research already. Thanks for your assistance, and feel free to contact me if you have questions. Alan Wong Middle School Humanities Teacher Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN awong@baylorschool.org 423-267-8506 ext. 371
 
Feb 13 2012 Posted By: Fin
As a tour operator in Bhutan, we are also grappling with a similar challenge. When we started out a few years back, we wanted to be as eco-conscious as possible. Used water bottles have now become a part of our burgeoning waste problem in the country, a country that doesn't even have a recycling plant. The irony is we do not generate enough trash to sustain one. All along we knew using bottled water was not the way to go, but we desperately needed a viable substitute to do away with it. We have been encouraging our clients to bring their own re-usable bottles and Steripen. While some get the idea, many decide to stick to bottled water. We are also planning on having our vehicles fitted with water filter canisters (holding 15-20 litres of water), which are capable of trapping sediments. To rid of any micro-organisms, water will be boiled and cooled overnight at hotels, ready to be transferred to the canisters. Given that water in Bhutan is free of heavy metals, this process should be adequate. However, we do know there will still be some people who might be uncomfortable and would want to stick to manufactured water. What's comforting though, is some people do take their own initiative to bring water bottles with purifiers, which is practical and works great. Any suggestion would be great. Thanks!
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jenny
Find the very best portable water purification systems and invest in some to have along on your journeys or at strategic points of destination. Use your own bottles and refill so that guests have a supply of one bottle per day. They can drink other beverages for the rest of their needs.
 
Feb 10 2012 Posted By: Jacqueline Fitz
For years I traveled with a simple water filter.... a cup with a built-in charcoal filter that took care of almost everything including giardia. Since I travelled in many remote areas, potable water was rarely available. I even filtered bottled water when I could getit since I was unsure of its quality. This technique was very successful through the years. Unfortunately that particular water filter is no longer available but something similar would address your problem. (I used mine in remote areas of China and also in Hong Kong)
 
Jan 18 2012 Posted By: Mei
I can testify that this is one of the best dishes at one of my favorite restaurants in Beijing. Mei
 
Nov 29 2011 Posted By: Joan morris
Where can I get Sichuan ingredients in the U S?
 
Nov 24 2011 Posted By: Ron Denham
My wife and I recently went on a WC tour led by Fred and he made it a marvelous and informative time for us. He sets the bar very high for any other tour guid I might everuse. I hope to go on another "Fred He" WC tour one of these days. Best wises to your parents, Fred. Ron & Gail Denham
 
Aug 31 2010 Posted By: Wang
Unfortunately, the only sustainable thing that the Schoolhouse has brought to their local community is a rising cost of living. They have basically taken over the village and surrounding communities and have forced local residents (who are mainly farmers) to find more affordable accommodation elsewhere. I support Slow Food and I am sure your overseas guests like the novelty of staying at the Schoolhouse in Mutianyu, but please don't portray them as a bunch of do-gooders. They are in it for the money, regardless of the consequences their uncontrolled and unchecked development might have on the local community.
 
Aug 17 2010 Posted By: Fayegirl
was in this area in May, even then was affected by landslides and flooding, how much more do these people have to suffer, my thoughts and prayers are with them
 
Jul 27 2010 Posted By: Brennan
Even though I won't be able to apply it seems like this is a wonderful area of China to visit. I know people who have visited the major cities and then complained about how dirty it was or how it was too congested but they didn't realize the best parts of the country aren't located in the most populated places but many times in the least populated. Should be a great trip for those involved.
 
Jul 25 2010 Posted By: Molly
You're writing about my home. It makes me feel like crying because I'm not there now. You've written the story beautifully. My father-in-law rode the tea and horse caravan train, made and lost fortunes, and now resides quietly in Dali with my brother-in-law. The traces that those adventures left in his heart are still there. Talking with him is another adventure that always leaves me wanting to cry. Now I'm in Zhangjiagang, running an eco-resort staffed with Yi from Xiao Liang Shan. The Yi too had their place on the trail, one of the main branches of which ran through their territory and via Lugu Lake. My father-in-law spend his formative years in Muli, just the other side of Lugu Lake, raised by another family of traders after his own parents were killed during clan scirmishes in Chamdo. Keep up the good work, and keep letting people know that it's not about visiting an alian culture, it's about visiting people like you or my, for whom the most spectacular scenery in the world is just called "home."
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jamie, Sure. Send me an email at alex.grieves@wildchina.com and I'll get you in touch. Best, Alex
 
Jul 21 2010 Posted By: Jamie
Hi! Wonderful article! Is there any way you could put me in touch with Tea Master Zehng? I would like to purchase some of her tea in bulk. Thank you!
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: yunnangirl
Well said. Lijiang is so beautiful regardless of the crowds. The key is to find ways to appreciate its beautify and connect with people there.
 
Jul 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
Mie. Thank you for your insight and perspective on a "different" China not often found by us common folk (even with a lot of research). Keep up the good work.
 
Jul 10 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China | Vacation In China
[...] is the original post: WildChina Blog · Travel Tip: Planning Luxury Family Travel in China Share and [...]
 
Jun 29 2010 Posted By: David Tanenui
I think you are right it sounds like everything is focussed on the top end of tourism, its a pity because the lower end tourists are the ones that are more inclined on caring for the environment and for the country contributing to sustainable practices. Money talks these days and the GDP is the aim of all countries, here in New Zealand we have beautiful sights but we have to fight to keep it beautiful, our government are only interested in making money of land that doesn't even belong to them but don't worry as soon as they have finished mining and destroying it they will say sorry and give it back to us the people of the land and give us $$$ for the damage they have created, WOW,you need to be more Vocal, the more voices creating opinions will create understanding Kia Ora
 
Jun 28 2010 Posted By: David
Hi, Earlier this month I posted my experiences using an iPad in China for research. I deal with the connection issues and VPNs to get around the Great Firewall. I found using WiFi very easy: http://museumfatigue.org/using-the-ipad-in-china
 
Jun 24 2010 Posted By: Bill
Nice post. I was thinking about picking up an iPad with China trips in mind. I think I've already found a solution for wired internet and that is to bring an airport express unit with me. It's proved invaluable on previous trips and is relatively easy to carry around. The other reason I'm considering the iPad is the ability to suck up RAW photos from a digital camera. My hope (although I've not tested it) is that this would free up the memory card to allow me to carry on shooting. Have you any experience of using it this way?
 
Jun 18 2010 Posted By: Michelle
Hello there, I'm producing a documentary about climate change and I wondered if you or anyone you know might be interested in being a "fixer" - our person on the ground in China to help set up the shoot and be with the director. Any help you might be able to give would be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Michelle
 
Jun 05 2010 Posted By: Ma Hao
Wow, Zhang Mei, my old schoolmate! Ages no see! Proud of you by reading every bit about you in this article.
 
May 04 2010 Posted By: johno
Ah, its good to have some clarity on the issue. Sometimes definitions get a bit muddy in such a cross-cultural translations. I'd be curious to learn about the fuding tea processor and wild tea from there.
 
Apr 29 2010 Posted By: Houses Philippines
And I know you might have good intentions, but now a days, it is common for people to come yup with scams. There are actually organizations who asks for donation but do not use the donation money for good. How can you assure us that your organization is genuine?
 
Apr 28 2010 Posted By: HM
I am totally agree with you on the first 4 places but the last one. I would rather say Shanghai is the last city for people to know China from my personal experience:) There is nothing fun in Shanghai besides shopping(expensive) and skyscrapers. I agree that Beijing is the best place to stay and Xi'an remains the second. Anyway, doesnt matter this blog is very helpful for who is planning a trip to China.
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 21 2010 Posted By: Klaus
Thank you so much for your support! On our Blog we provide a Paypal donation option. Our Teams in the region mostly need donations to buy tents, food, medication and, later on, construction materiel for the people that have lost everything. Thank you!
 
Apr 20 2010 Posted By: Trevor
Do you need volunteers on the ground, just financial donations, or both?
 
Apr 16 2010 Posted By: Jason
I am happy to hear of your kind display of corporate responsibility and general kindness. The tragedies in the news today need all of our attentions and efforts to help those involved cope. Keep up the good work!
 
Apr 14 2010 Posted By: Ian Sanchez
Congratulations Mei Zhang! It will be good for the adventure travel industry to have your perspective.
 
Apr 08 2010 Posted By: lyni
very interesting. I'm fond of chinese tea. Do you plan any trip in zijing mountain for tea picking ?? It could be great.
 
Feb 12 2010 Posted By: Spencer
Hello Mei: I stumbled upon your site and will look into it on a regular basis. I am from Canada and have been to China on assignment to shoot several time. I am planning a three-person trip this fall for three months. We are journalists from Canada (me), and two Chinese journalists who live in the United States. Our trip back to China is unique. We will be test driving three different Chinese vehicles and be blogging, filming and writing articles for our respective newspapers and web sites. This trip is about 11,750 kilometres in length. In addition to reviewiing these vehicles under challenging conditions, I will be writing about the culture, history and daily life on the road. Our blog is not up yet, but closer to the time, I will give you the link. The think that grabbed my attention about your site was the line, 'Experience China Differently'. I have fallen in love with China and have been to many parts of the country. I prefer the rural settings and the people are always warm, hospitable and welcoming wherever I go. I long to return and bring more adventures and images to the millions of readers who frequent our newspaper's site. The Toronto Star is the largest newspaper in the country with an enviable readership. Perhaps next time I am in Beijing I will look you up. I have my regular guide in Beijing and she can bring me to you for a visit. Sincerely, Spencer Wynn www.travelstock.org (this is only my stock website)
 
Feb 03 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Loved the untold story behind the conde Nast piece.
 
Jan 27 2010 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Interesting. but also there are other solar centers around China. Know any more?
 
Jan 18 2010 Posted By: Li.rui
Yes, we had a week training classes that we leart lots of informitiaon and knowledge from it, thanks every teacher. Expecting I'll have more training chance to study and promote myself.
 
Jan 12 2010 Posted By: WildChina Blog · NYTimes’ “31 Places to Visit in 2010″ features Shanghai and Shenzhen
[...] the Travel+Leisure feature, and now this article in the New York Times: it is increasingly apparent that China is set to [...]
 
Jan 08 2010 Posted By: Rongkun
I wish I could have known it earlier!
 
Dec 28 2009 Posted By: Bart Batsleer
Hi, I`ve been in touch with Stewart when I was in Guilin, but I lost his phone number... could you bring him back in touch with me for I have my brother and sister going to Guilin... Thank you. Bart
 
Dec 09 2009 Posted By: Bo Poats
Abby: Intruiging intro....easier to be a leader in renewable energy when you have a single view of the value of externalities, and an ability to scale manufactuiring to lower unit costs in order to hit financial objectives on the supply side. Would be good to know how the average Zho utilizes renewable energy and is educated about its economic applicatiions (i.e., the role of public education and programs), as there may be some lessons to be learned in more "developed" economies.
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: Beth Dohrn
I can't wait to share this with my son! What great information Alexander!
 
Dec 08 2009 Posted By: mitey de aguiar
This is a fascinating article! I had no idea that T Rex lived in that part of the world. I'm sure some amazing discoveries are on their way.
 
 
 
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Jason
Thanks for the helpful information. I plan to be in China during that time... just need to make plans.
 
Nov 19 2009 Posted By: Alex G
Hi Jason, thanks for your inquiry! The Harbin Ice and Snow Festival begins on January 5 and continues for about a month. However, there are a variety of related activities at Sun Island Park, Zhaolin Park, and venues in Harbin city proper starting in mid-December. You may find a full schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/2DT6EE It is open from 9 am to 10 pm daily, and daily admission for adults is 150 RMB. There are separate entrance fees for Sun Island Park and Zhaolin Park; admission is 30 RMB per adult. Please let us know if you have any other questions!
 
Nov 17 2009 Posted By: Jason
What is the schedule for the Harbin winter festival in 2010? Is there an official time or schedule of events?
 
Nov 09 2009 Posted By: Andrea
Just catching up on your blog, Heth...beautiful stuff
 
Nov 08 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
fantastic news..thanks for sharing .
 
Oct 31 2009 Posted By: Yunnangirl
Oh, this entry made me homesick. I still remember the sound of us driving on top of the crop that's being dried on the road. That was the first step of processing rice after harvest. Thank you for writing this piece.
 
Oct 26 2009 Posted By: Tessa
I love the blog Heather- hope everything is going well for you
 
Oct 23 2009 Posted By: Elyane
Very jealous Heather! Can't wait to hear about Xinjiang...
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Linda Winn
What a wonderful generous gesture to get a beautiful new basketball court built for this poor village so that the children can thrive. Xiao is a very special person and his love for the Miao people is great indeed. How happy he made these people!
 
Oct 15 2009 Posted By: Kevin
This is a great article. Look forward to reading the rest. I will be going to a small village in January to visit my wife's grandmother and brother. They also do not live too far from Xi'an. I am looking forward to your updates and pictures.
 
Oct 14 2009 Posted By: Jason
Very very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
Oct 03 2009 Posted By: Clark
I just got back from the Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Area and was not impressed with the place. They jacked the prices up for the National Day holiday, but only half the park was even functioning. What a rip-off.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Kate
I've subscribed to your blog and look forward to reading more...thanks for your eloquent insights Heather! Australians can learn so much from ancient and indigenous cultures.
 
Oct 02 2009 Posted By: Heather.Graham
Yes, you are absolutely correct Russell. A large majority of the young people from Huayang go to the bigger cities (particularly in southern China) to work after they finish secondary school here. Receiving money from your children working elsewhere, is one of the two main forms of income for the people of Huayang (the other is growing medicine plants). Thanks for your question.
 
Oct 01 2009 Posted By: Andrea Redford
Great blog Heather. Thanks for sharing your unique insights into China. All the best with the Golden Week influx!
 
Sep 30 2009 Posted By: Li.rui
it 's really really true and a good place of CNNR and a beauty Astrilian work and devote here now~~~
 
Sep 26 2009 Posted By: prizebig.ru
superb article . Will definitely copy it to my blog.Thanks.
 
Sep 25 2009 Posted By: Russell
Heather, great post. A question that came to mind: with such a small population, is there pressure on the younger people to move away to the big cities to secure work?
 
 
Sep 16 2009 Posted By: frank
Hey, i liked this article, Im a hiker my self and i promise to go take time one day to go check it out :) and will I will put a link back at http://www.travelmastery.com as a complementary purpose. please post more pics!
 
Sep 11 2009 Posted By: sandrar
Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post... nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.
 
Aug 10 2009 Posted By: Maureen Lopez
china has never been associated with the snow sports.howvever you will definitely enjoy in the ski resorts which has been listed. it will be a very nice experience to visit these resorts and enjoy the snow sports.
 
Jul 20 2009 Posted By: Jason Witt
This is a nice complete list of the basic Chinese teas. Any tea lover should have tried all these listed here a few different times with different water temperatures and multiple steepings. Of course loose leaf tea will be needed. It's all about the fun of exploration and the adventure of discovering new favorites.
 
Jul 13 2009 Posted By: stephen
Great tips! About the Eating one though, I've also heard a different side: leaving anything behind could be seen as a sign of wastefulness or ingratitude (especially for a man). I've often been told, "If you know how hard somebody worked to harvest that rice for your meal, you wouldn't waste a single grain." I guess it probably depends where you are or who you talk with though, and like everything else, foreigners do have some leeway for any cultural faux pas made. :)
 
Jul 11 2009 Posted By: auf Abriss « Carl August
[...] Bild: wildchina.com [...]
 
Apr 08 2009 Posted By: costa caleta
costa caleta... I think the post- vacation blues definitely set in last week when I got back, and linger on today. I saw a lot of neat things and met some wonderful people, but it's back to the grind here in DC. I wish I could travel more. /...
 
 
 
Mar 03 2009 Posted By: Yeah That’s Kosher! >> a Kosher Travel blog » Blog Archive » Focus on: CHINA
[...] Keeping Kosher while Traveling in China [...]
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
it seems to require quite some time to display the photos since they are too big-sized.
 
Feb 14 2009 Posted By: Rongkun
It would be some misleading since Beijing University was not a recognized name, if referred to Peking University. The latter name is officially adopted in public.
 
Oct 10 2008 Posted By: Beijing » Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China Panel
[...] Condé Nast World Savers Congress: China PanelSo far we’ve hosted four WWF guides on month-long stints in the WildChina Beijing office to learn about responsible travel best-practices, marketing and service standards. The goal of this project is to expose local leaders to different … [...]
 
Aug 26 2008 Posted By: Wilbur
Taking photos with the guards looks fun. The view of the Great Wall is undoubtly magnificant.
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: China Journal : Best of the China Blogs: August 5
[...] of the Great Wall and other popular tourist attractions may be closed due to Olympic events. See here for updates. WildChina [...]
 
Aug 05 2008 Posted By: Emma
Anita is too shy to post her videos from this trip, but I think they're pretty cool! Check out her YouTube videos of Miao Minority Dances in Guizhou, as well as a ground opera at Jichang Village. The quality isn't great (we're travel gurus, not videographers!!) but you can still get a flavor of her trip. http://www.youtube.com/user/wildchinaus
 
Jul 30 2008 Posted By: Emma
Love your first blog post Anita! Very excited to follow your trek through China from my computer in the WildChina office in Beijing. Come back to us safe and sound!
 
Jul 06 2008 Posted By: Joy
Yes, really appreciate your visit, thank you so much!
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University taiwan
 
Jun 17 2008 Posted By: elachian
給四川的人, 我是從電視上看到你們的地震的災情. 我知道你們現在很痛苦, 特地寫了這封信, 想要告訴你們, 安威你們, 希望你們好好加油. 重建家園, 讓我們一起努力, 幫助你們, 早日忘記現在的陰影. 不只我們在這裡我要告訴你們, 現在全球各地大家都希望你們會再一次站起來. 我相信你們. 加油, 四川人! 陸愛蓮 Kainan University Taiwan ROC
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: seb
Thank you Philip for these précisions. I wish China stand as soon as possible after the disaster. I plan to come in Siguniang next October. Do you think it will be re oppened for foreign visitors? Thanks
 
Jun 07 2008 Posted By: Eric
At this very time, all of people are united to overcome the catastrophe! I just went through the earthquake in person. It felt horrible and so many tragedies happened! With our deepest condolence!
 
Jun 03 2008 Posted By: Eric
Eric... Hello, I have a few websites of my own and I must say that your site is really top notch. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource....
 

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